Oolong brewing guide

 

General guidelines for Oolong tea brewing

As the degree of oxidation of the leaf is the determining factor of its flavour, the oolong teas end up with very different aromas. It is one of the most varied families with one of the richest aromatic diversity. Currently I’m using Postcard teas Yimu Oolong and on their website (http://www.postcardteas.com/site/product/yimu-oolong/) they describe its aroma as follows: “Its light, floral aroma and vanilla sweetness make this an ideal place to start for people new to oolong, especially for those who enjoy the delicate flavour of green tea but can find it too grassy or vegetal.” 

Screenshot 2019-01-22 at 20.29.38.png

The general BREWING GUIDELINES for OOLONG tea are as follows:  Wash briefly the leaves with 95C water for 20 seconds.  Pour off the water and wait for 2 minutes.  The brew the first proper infusion for 45 seconds and the following ones at 30 seconds.  5-6g per 150ml.  Good for 5-6 infusions.


Oolong flavour description

Yimu oolong: Its light, floral aroma and vanilla sweetness make this a ideal place to start for people new to oolong, especially for those who enjoy the delicate flavour of green tea but can find it too grassy or vegetal.
Roasted
Yimu oolong: This tea is processed in a similar way to Yimu Oolong, but has been given more charcoal roasting bringing out a more robust, caramelised taste. This tea has a complex aroma, with notes of candied nuts and stewed fruit, as well as a sweet, toasty flavour. Great as an evening drink and with or after food.
Spring high mountain: This is an excellent example of a lightly oxidised high mountain oolong, with a bright, fresh character that combines tropical fruit and vegetal flavours. 
Oriental Beauty: lovely, long sweetness and notes of peach, honey and orange zest with a taste that lingers on the palate well after it has been drunk. In later infusions it has the intensity of a second flush Darjeeling black tea, with similar muscatel flavours coming into the foreground.
Wuyi: It has a thick body and strong minerality, with a sweetness reminiscent of vanilla and dark fruits which will become more intense as the roast settles down. This is an exemplary example of a heavy roasted tea done well.
Taiwanese green:
Phoenix: a well-structured aroma that is simultaneously reminiscent of flowers, cooked fruit and citrus, and a honeyed sweetness that fills the mouth and throat. The tea shows a nice progression through many infusions with a constant floral perfume and pleasant astringency.